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20121202
20121210
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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
, reduce the deficit, and begin to show leadership in various areas of new technology that demonstrated here to the rest of the world. kohl will always be there. -- coal is always going to be there. there's lots of work there. all the sales will help, i think, of leverage our capability and give us more options. >> let me bring you in. 92% of american transportation is run on petroleum. with this new landscape for energy production of, how are we doing on diversifying different kinds of things that are running our transportation? >> so far, it is going slow. something that was deeply focused on was something note senator alexander said earlier. we need to find more and use less. i think you're asking about the use less part. the extension of the changing fuel efficiency standards was one thing, but we believe fervently in the need to diversify away from using petroleum for transportation and given that it represents 70% of our use of petroleum to begin with. with the change in technology and the access to so much homegrown natural gas, we can use that and we can also use the development
of what the technology can matter is because we did not have to limit the school day anymore to the hours inside the school room. as -- there is much more we can do. i watch people here from a great school in sweden. and they have managed to create a portal in ways. i met a kid whose mother was an aris -- was a nurse. we are the only profession that admits we are failing in what we're doing for our kids and we all go home at 3:00. there has to be a way to think differently about the dimensions of the challenge. i think technology is part of that problem. about to go back to what condie started. as important as music and art and global history is, to two cannot read into basic mathematics -- kids who cannot read or do basic mathematics will not do higher or critical thinking. we have to figure out how to build the foundation and then build on the foundation. tragically we are doing either. rex you began by pointing out the fact that we are falling behind. 30, 50 years ago we ranked a lot higher than we did in basic skills sets. -- we ranked a lot higher in basic skills sets. >> a cautionar
to things they lost attention of in the first term. i think there are limited areas where the technology and the process of institutionalizing some of these practices can drive the train, to mix metaphors. as we discussed before, once you have white house logs coming out on a regular basis, it is hard not to seek proposals about standardizing the handling of foia request across agencies. we should put on line all foia requests. in this era of big data and big storage, i cannot see any reason why this cannot be done fairly cheaply. it has not happened. maybe some of those and that is happening on a small scale can build up some -- maybe some of those advances happening on a small-scale can build up some momentum. those of the small scale advances that i think are plausible to see happening in becoming four years. >> in the united kingdom, they have a functioning version of the foia model called what do they know? it is fascinating how they are able to make this information available in ways we are working toward now. we are going to open up to questions from the audience. before we do so,
in national efficiency that has been brought about by technology and the new fuel efficiency standards that were enacted by the bush administration and were increased by the obama administration. the report is not political in any way shape or form. it endorses things that are supported by the right in some cases and that are supported by people on the left. you cannot just take the parts that you like. you have to take the holistic approach, to maximize u.s. production and to reduce consumption partly by diversifying our transportation sector away from petroleum. the last thing i will say is that petroleum use in transportation is the pivot point of this entire problem. 70% of our use of petroleum in this country is for transportation. transportation is fueled about 93% of the time by petroleum. if you want to reduce the united states' dependence on imported petroleum and the related geopolitical issues, particularly in an issue when rising demand is creating a potential conflict for these resources, then you have to recognize transportation has to be diversified away from petroleum o
efficiency that's been brought about by technology and the new fuel efficiency standards that were enacted by the bush administration first, and then, of course, were increased by the obama administration. it's important to recognize that the eslc report is not political in any way, shape or form. it endorses things that are heartily supported by the right , in some cases, and on the other hand that are supported by people on the left. it's important to recognize you can't just take the parts that you like. you have to take the wholistic approach, which is to, again, maximize u.s. production and to at the same time significantly reduce consumption partly by diversifying our transportation sector away from petroleum. now, the last thing i'll say before we sit down is it's important to recognize that petroleum use in transportation is the pivot point of this entire problem. about 70% of our 18.7 million barrel per day use of petroleum in this country is for transportation, and transportation is fueled about 93% of the time by petroleum. so if you want to reduce the united states' dependence
challenges that we are facing on technological advances. that has created a situation where the engine of sustainable economic growth and center of the middle -- the good a middle- class jobs are not as plentiful as they once were. finding a way to get them back or at least find a new way to create the middle class jobs that are sustainable as a court challenge that we face as a country. i also want to say that, we should not get stuck -- in my view should not get stuck thinking we have to solve the whole problem right away. t -- 2% growth makes everything look worse. if you were to create the aggregate demand that would give confidence to small businesses to invest again and again construction and housing going, would get the people coming into the workforce and we would start to see reasonable growth, the challenges seem a lot more solvable. i think we often get lost a in the hard challenges of our long- term future economic growth when some of the short-term challenges are not that complicated. if we were to make the infrastructure investments that we need, if we were to do the kind
that technology has created more advanced ought mated factories and that has resulted in fewer jobs necessary to build products. there is no question about that and that is a negative in terms of job creation. but it's also positive in that we have seen a little bit of a trend, and we saw apple this week announce they were going to make one of their products in the united states. it was related to the economics underliing this. if you need fewer people to make the stuff, then the cost difficult rerble to make it here versus there i did minute shs then the argument is we can make it. number two there is a national advisory counsel and one of the areas of focus has been in additive manufacturing which is really an interesting area. over the next decade it has the potential to have much more personal liesed approach, more custo approaches to manufacturing that could result in more things being made here as opposed to being made other places. so it is a concern but people are more optimistic now than five years ago because some of this technology advancing actually is starting to be in some secto
like? what is the cable industry going to look like? >> i would say it followed the technological trends that have transformed all the businesses. the first and would probably observe is the dramatic shift from hardware to software- centered systems. the minute you are able to do more in software rather than proprietary hardware, i think that is coming to television. you are right to ask the consumer what is dtv experience in the home. they will talk about a box that sits on the credenza. they will talk about the remote control. they will talk about what they do not like about that, to be perfectly candid. but they will talk about halt all of this will be migrated into software rather than proprietary hardware, and i think you will get innovation. a company like time warner or comcast can innovate overnight, not with the hardware replacement. then, i think you see the other great trend that we have seen in mobile and the app environments. then you are able to deliver a new, interesting experience. you have the information that we all love, but also married that with the pipe. i ho
on insuring that we get it right when it comes to technology, making sure we have a trained work force so that we can be the job creators and the folks that seem incomes rise -- see incomes rise. when we talk to candidates, we go for the job creators. >> when you look specifically to the 2014 elections, especially in the midwestern states where republicans have a pretty large victories in 2010, what is your overarching argument against those republican governors? they have led to charges that that anger the democratic base. will that be the basis of your message to unseating some of those governors? >> here is the state that produces the automobiles for america that with out president obama and the bailout of the automobile industry probably would not be in business right now. you have the governor down there institutional right to work policies that are against the interest of 30% of every living person in michigan. this is a nutty stuff. they focus on ticking away women's rights, standing for the most extreme elements of the tea party that got rejected. huge opportunities for the democr
been brought about by technology and the new fuel efficiency standards that were enacted by the bush administration and were increased by the obama administration. the report is not political in any way shape or form. it endorses things that are supported by the right in some cases and that are supported by people on the left. you cannot just take the parts that you like. you have to take the holistic approach, to maximize u.s. production and to reduce consumption partly by diversifying our transportation sector away from petroleum. the last thing i will say is that petroleum use in transportation is the pivot point of this entire problem. 70% of our use of petroleum in this country is for transportation. transportation is fueled about 93% of the time by petroleum. if you want to reduce the united states' dependence on imported petroleum and the related geopolitical issues, particularly in an issue when rising demand is creating a potential conflict for these resources, then you have to recognize transportation has to be diversified away from petroleum or the prices are set on the wo
, the old cassette tape idea to using the latest in digital technology. we are excited about the transition because it makes it faster, cheaper, and more efficient to get good quality reading materials to people when they need it. the service is obviously designed for the government to be sure that people have equitable access to the materials. in the spirit of public libraries in this country, we have more public libraries than mcdonald's, we have a chance with a service like this to be sure everybody has a chance to be well informed citizens, which is obviously the most critical and being able to enjoy the rewards of a great novel and literature and being a part of the world a run them. host: our next segment deals with the jobless rate. joining us is rick newman. the numbers said 7.7% when it comes to the unemployment rate. can you tell us what leads to that number? guest: there are some people getting jobs, but as you mentioned a couple of minutes ago, i think the bigger factor is the labor force actually shrunk in november. fewer people were working or looking for work. the unemploymen
. the clerk: h.r. 6582, a bill to allow for innovations and alternative technologies that meet or exceed desired energy efficiency goals and to make technical corrections to existing federal energy efficiency laws, to allow american manufacturers to remain competitive. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from kentucky, mr. which the field, and the gentleman from california, mr. waxman, each will control 20 minutes. the chair now recognizes the gentleman from kentucky. mr. whitfield: thank you, mr. speaker. i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks and insert extraneous material in the record and i would like to include several letters including the energy and commerce committee's exchange of letters with the science, space and technology committee and the transportation and infrastructure committee. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. whitfield: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. whitfield: i rise to
technologies to enable faster, safer passenger trains on all of our existing rail corridors. with years of solid planning in place, illinois and its midwest partners were ready to move quickly on april 16 in 2009 when president obama called for a national network that connected high-speed rail corridors. secretary lahood earlier compared the president's vision to the 1950's blueprint for building the u.s. interstate highway system. the federal railroad administration reported illinois $1.2 billion in january 2010 to upgrade service between dwight and east st. louis. the government illinois in full partner with his commitment of $400 million in state funds for high-speed rail from his $31 billion capital program. federal awards also provided funding to construct a key rail flyover in the englewood neighborhood of chicago's south side to improve mobility. and for the chicago detroit corridor, the next expected route. illinois has a vested $200,00 in that route in cooperation with michigan and indiana. work is progressing to provide needed training which will enable high-speed service to c
and wildlife foundation for marine debris remp and technology. from the -- research and technology. from 2005 to 2011, this program supported 46 projects involving fishermen, ports, marinists and they leveraged $2.7 million in noaa funding with $2.9 million in nonfederal matching funds. another program, fishing for energy, is one of an innovative program that has collection bins for commercial fishermen to dispose of unwanted fishing gear. it's disposed more than 700 of obsolete dare elect gear which -- dire elect gear which has lost marketable lobster and saves up to $792 million in damages to boat propelers from direlect fishing gear. if that isn't enough, the energy from them recycles gear. it doesn't cost the fishermen anything to dispose of this gear and that's why it's such a successful program. this small federal investment results in huge cost savings. marine debris is much larger and a growing problem. with disasters in japan last year and the recent storms like sandy, cleaning up debrises requires both resources and coordination between agencies and states. while i commend the bipar
that are going to be incredible. you know, we've got great technology that's available. but none of that is worth a damn without the men and women in uniform who are willing to put their lives on the line and help to protect this country. that is the real strength. ^that is the heart and soul of what makes us the strongest country in the world. we owe them as a result of that the finest medical care that this nation can provide. and that's why i'm so grateful that we have the greatest medical healthcare system in the world, right here. and the strength of our system lies in you, and people like you. thousands of dedicated professionals who are committed to caring for our sick and for our injured. it lies with each of you. this, as i have said before, is a place where miracles happen, and you are the miracle workers. today, i want to thank you, along with the entire military medical community, for the exceptional care, the exceptional support you provide our service members, for these men and women in uniform, for their families, and for our military retirees. you give them a second chance at life
have to look across all technologies that we pursue and recognize that the significant technological challenges that have been associated with that program and really, i think, in the time frame that we've had to develop these systems, i think we've -- the technological part of this defense has donna mazing things in that time frame to be able to produce the caments that are there now. and i'm confident they're going to produce the result you're asking about in the near future. as far as the overall, how you would put a p.a.a. in europe, i came from europe in my last position. and again, it goes back to a discussion for me about europe versus the size and the immensity and vastness of this region, a region even the pacific region in the indopacific and trying to apply that exact model to a defense of this area, i think that would be a stretch for me. however, i think there are opportunities as we look at our alliances, as we look at our growing partnerships, as we look at multilateral organizations who are investing in ballistic missile defense capabilities of their own. if they are
that with a vision on education, on ensuring that we get it right when it comes to technology, making sure we have a trained work force for the jobs that aring with created, so we can be the job creators and we see incomes rise on our constituent. that is what voters judge you by. when we come out and talk to candidates we go for job creators, folks who are going to create jobs in this economy. >> when you look specifically to the 2014 election and in the midwestern state where is republicans had pretty large victories in 2010, what is your argument over those republicans governors? obviously, some of these republican governors have changed some laws and angered some of the democratic base. if not, what is it? >> let's look at some of those races. let's take michigan as an example because it has been in the press. here is the state that produces the automobiles for america that without president obama and the bailout of the auto industry, probably wouldn't in business right now. you've got to governor down there instituting right to work policies that are against the interests of 30% of every livi
they would take their own proceeds and reinvested back into their technology, like a business can do, and the fha is restricted. i had to go to congress and ask them to draft a bill and get legislation to allow us to raise premiums to protect our risk. that is the proposition for success over the long term. that is where the debate should be. how do we make this realization most effective, with best deals, best credit risk, so they can support the system and a little less about let's continue to pull the support out from under them? >> can you do that, because if you can, then the things you talked about are true. but if there are limits to what legislation does or does not do, and doesn't that raise questions over all these other things? a lot of the loss mitigation of the administration has been trying to encourage the private sector what they are limited to do on their own book. if you are making low downpayment loans and think principal reduction is the right way to deal with underwater borrowers, that is where i am going, is that achievable what you are talking about? >> i say w
technology, all of the great capability and genius of the american people we know we can reduce these costs. the fairness argument is, is it fair to always lead with reducing it on the backs of the beneficiaries as opposed to what the root problem is of the cost and the expense? yes, sir. >> there's been a lot of talk about reducing tax loopholes. stepping aside from the debate whether or not there should be deductions or tax breaks, how do democrats feel about the mortgage interest tax deduction and whether or not that should be talked about or raise revenues by reducing the mortgage interest rate? >> when you look at everything in a comprehensive manner, and in the total aspects of tax reform in general, everything should be included on the table. s having said that, this is the backbone of the -- one of the back bones of the middle class. and clearly we support and feel very strongly about sustaining the middle class who use that mortgage deduction and mortgage buildup to for the most part pay for college education as well. >> so you feel that dealing with the mortgage interest deduction
care issue. we talked about technology and data sharing. there are productivity, issues that are significant. >> i want to touch on some other hot-button topics we have not discussed as much. capital gains, dividends. current laws, they go back up. dividends treated as ordinary income. capital gains goes back up to 20%. how much revenue are we talking about? if those become bargaining chips, how much are we giving up? >> under current law, the capital gains rate is scheduled to go to 20%. we are actually talking 23.8%. dividends are scheduled to go to ordinary rates. you need the 3.8% for people who have higher incomes. significant increases in both are scheduled. as you think about the fiscal cliff and what is coming, one of the few places you can see people responding to it is in their behavior around capital gains and dividends. companies are moving up to how, shareholders take a vintage of a lower rate. i expect you will see more investors realize lower capital gains in order to get lower rates. there is clearly money there. there is clearly money that has interestin
ground on technology is going to win both warfare and politics and we can't allow that to happen again. one lesson is you want to make sure from a perspective you are communicating your message to people and ensuring not only they are supporters but also voters. >> how do you regain the technological high ground? >> investing in it. it's there and can be done. the technology of 2012 was amazing and 2016 is indescribable. has to be invested in and priority. the chairman inherited a party that had financial problems and got the party out of a financial hole which didn't create a lot of time and space. part of what we need to do. you need to have a marketing department but you need to have a good production department. you need to have good policy that you are selling and state of the art methods. >> you personally tweet? >> i try to. but no one has ever sent a tweet on my behalf. i control my own twitter feed because it is authentic and it is about hip-hop and sports. >> you are a dolphins guy? >> yeah. they got beat last sunday. >> what devices do you carry? >> iphone. i didn't know if
, and it took longer and longer and longer to get to the destination, and were it not for the technology that now you see runs rampant through our lives, we never could have done it. the situation in the new york region is really miraculous in so many ways, and i think the agency is a great agency. not without its faults. >> chairman, thank you for your service. members of the committee, thank you for holding this hearing. on behalf of the port authority, i want to thank you personally for your support of the port authority in our region. is a privilege to testify before you and this committee. i want to thank governor's andrew cuomo and chris christie for their strong leadership before, during, and after sandy. we are fortunate to have such remarkable governors' meeting our region through this difficult time. i m patrick roye. we operate what is one of the most important transportation network in the world. our access includes five airports, three of which comprise the busiest airport system in the country. we also maintain for bridges, including the george washington bridge. the busies
. i understand there are agreements. are you looking at technology that will be used of the passenger rail system so we can achieve the highest possible? >> absolutely. this is defined as 110 miles per hour. >> do think that is a bad definition? >> that is a pretty fast train. look. i been on trains to spain and other countries and china the code to under 53 miles an hour -- tour de miles an hour -- 253 miles an hour. california where you are building new infrastructure, and do it at 2 under miles an hour. that is what we're going to do. in illinois the best we can do is 110 miles per hour. would we like to go to hundred? of course we would. it is not possible. >> it is a standard we can live with. >> that is right. there has been some criticism as well that the money that has not been spent yet, if you think it has been reasonable to has been the amount of money without developing the plan and making obligations for the studies that are required? is not ok to have obligated the money and still ask for more because we can obligate more ?hat's >> of the past four years we have not seen
longer and longer and longer to get to the destination and backed and were it not for the technology that now you see runs ran it through our lives, we never could have done it. the situation in the new york region is really miraculous in so many ways. i think the agency is a great agency. >> let me thank you for your service to the country and as a commissioner of the port authority and in the senate. thank you for holding this hearing. on behalf of the port authority, i want to thank you personally for your tireless support of the port authority in our region. it is a privilege today to testify before you and this is deemed committee. i would also like to think governor's andrew cuomo of new york and chris christie of new jersey for their strong leadership before, during and after super storm sandy. we are lucky to have such remarkable governors to lead through this region. and the executive director of the port authority in new york and new jersey. for those not familiar with the agency, we operate the most important multi mode transportation network in the world. our transportati
in oil and gas production as well. people talk about the technology and access on private lands. but if we did not have $12 gas and $85 oil, do not see the development -- you would not see development of unconventional is. -- unconventionals. host: robert from st. louis, missouri. caller: thank you for having me. i agree with the previous caller, who had some question as to whether we get complete information. i share that. i was wondering but specifically, brazil has converted pretty much to ethanol. i wonder whether government was responsible for that. i wonder why we have not made much stuff there. is clean coal in it? i've heard that it is. -- a muyth? yth? --a myth? i have heard that it is. why don't we have a push for household and commercial utilities to primarily use natural gas equipment, like water heaters, home heating, so one instead of having to generate electricity with other fuels? cote fracking, i've seen a documentary that showed people turning on their water faucets and they could actually like them. yet it seems to be -- light them. yet it seems to be sweepin
of the day. if we use satellite computer technology to analyze, prioritize commack and design. the 163% one is also dangerous. two men have been killed of their in the past three years. in the first years of its existence it was considered one of the most accident prone and the stages. host: you think this should be at the top of the fiscal cliff negotiations right now? caller: yes, because it would put a lot of people to work with our infrastructure. we have a big problem with our infrastructure. traffic is deplorable. up in's lives are going smoke. host: tony is from fort worth, texas. welcome to "the washington journal." caller: i think this a compromise because if they do not compromise and go over the cliff, this will set the standard for the next four years. i worked -- i voted for president obama, but i was also afraid he could not get anything done at the last four years. i believe that if they really want to put the american people first and stop playing politics and just put the american people first and come to some kind of deal because the debt ceiling debate is coming up and al
, firing it into your or israel, and ultimately getting a icbm technology, being able to reach the united states? this is a classic paradigm. wmd terrorism. what are the real risks of wmd terrorism and throw their significant risks. -- terrorism? >> there are significant risks. when you look at chemical and biological, they're also very significant threats there. when you look what happened in world war ii, the japanese army dropped infected fleas in china and killed 50,000 people as a biotech. played infected fleas killed 50,000 people -- plague-infected fleas killed 50,000 people. you have terrorist groups in the middle east. al-qaeda has tried very hard for years to develop wmd. probably the closest they came was when there were a group of retired pakistan the leaders -- pakistani leaders to try to team up with al-qaeda to help them develop a wmd. luckily they were tracked down upon before things got too far out of hand. that is an example of al qaeda. you have to worry potentially about iranian scientists teaming any similar way. you look at hezbollah, there are rumors that hezbollah
substations like senator lieberman's near the water, nor did they invest in smart grid technology that i a lous you to use computers and sensors to respond to outages, learn where the damage is and communicate with customer. the lack of investment, leadership and foresightly lifa is costing us big time. it doesn't give me pleasure to report to this committee that they'll be submitting an stiment $400 billion -- an estimated $800 million bill to fema. it would be foolish to give them $800 million without making them update. so i've asked to include a significant rate stabilization and mitigation plan into any reimbursement they issue to lifa. it's imperative that this process start now with the full cooperation of the federal government. it's my understanding that this week, new york state began discussing with fema a system wide mitigation proposal where the authority would submit a large plan to harden the system as opposed to individual work sheets and i would encourage the committee to work with us on this. just one more point on subways, sandy decimated the new york -- the new york c
by technology and the new fuel efficiency standards that were enacted by the bush administration and were increased by the obama administration. the report is not political in any way shape or form. it endorses things that are supported by the right in some cases and that are supported by people on the left. you cannot just take the parts that you like. you have to take the holistic approach, to maximize u.s. production and to reduce consumption partly by diversifying our transportation sector away from petroleum. the last thing i will say is that petroleum use in transportation is the pivot point of this entire problem. 70% of our use of petroleum in this country is for transportation. transportation is fueled about 93% of the time by petroleum. if you want to reduce the united states' dependence on imported petroleum and the related geopolitical issues, particularly in an issue when rising demand is creating a potential conflict for these resources, then you have to recognize transportation has to be diversified away from petroleum or the prices are set on the world market. canada and n
young career. for example, he's played an active role in introducing new technology to both students and staff, has worked to develop 21st century learning skills in a classroom environment that fosters creativity, innovation and critical thinking. most importantly, ryan works tirelessly to help his students achieve success in the classroom. ryan devlin, thank you for your commitment to the teaching profession and congratulations. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? >> permission to address the house for one minute, mr. speaker, and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized. >> mr. speaker, members, as announced earlier by congressman ralph hall, we lost a member of the texas legislature, congressman jack brooks, who proudly served his southeast texas district for 42 years after he was first elected in 1952. mr. green: ultimatelying as dean in this house of representatives and dean of our texas delegation. i knew jack br
care issue as well, we talked about technology, data sharing, there's a lot of productivity issues embedded in this. >> we have a couple of minutes left, a couple other hot button topics we haven't discussed as much. capital gains and dividends. dividends treated as ordinary income, capital gains up to 20%. how much revenue are we talking about there? and if those become bargaining chips how much are we giving up? >> the cap gains rate is scheduled to go to 20%. but we're actually talking 23.8%. dividends currently at 15%, scheduled to go to ordinary rates, and add the 3.8% as well for people who have high enough incomes. significant increases. interesting fact as you think about the fiscal cliff and what's coming, you see people responding to it in their behavior around capital gains and dividends. companies are moving up dividends into this year to help vare shareholders take advantage of the lower rate. you see and i expect you'll see more investors realizing capital gains to get lower rate this is year. there's clearly money there and there's clearly money that has if you will,
they say, well, our property, our cars, our technology wears out faster. guest: the current law is not correct. and this has to do with the retailers and the restaurants. their provision is that they get to deduct their property over 15 years instead of over 39 years. and they say, you know, 39 years is unrealistic and 15 years is more on money. host: how long you have been writing about taxes? guest: i've been write being taxes for maybe five years. host: how much do you think you know about the u.s. tax code? guest: not so much. i mean, like, i talk to tax experts, people with law degrees. and they probably know a lot about one part of the tax code. so, there are only like a few people i know who just have an encyclopedic knowledge about the entire thing who could say, in section 140-c-34 -- so those are very few and far between. i know more than many people. host: if somebody sat you down and said, write a book about the u.s. tax code -- guest: i could probably write about it in a more entertaining way. that's why i'm here to sort of bridge the gap between the tax nerds who k
at ways to address soaring college costs. the groundswell of creativity and technological change will lead to dramatic reductions of higher education so long as government policy does not stand in the way. we should make sure our federal aid programs do not discriminate against online course credit and help give parents and students march oysters. ideally, we need to reform our federal loan programs. college affordability is an issue that is important. it is the only reason i was able to go to college. the only reason is because of federal grants and loans. when i graduate from law school , i had close to $150,000 in student debt. that is a debt i paid off last year. i was able to help pay it off with my book that is now out on amazon. [applause] >> explore the paul broun system should the four students take out a loan, let's make sure parents and students understand how long it will take them to complete the education, the likelihood of completion, how much did they can expect to make after graduation, and tom on their -- and how much of their monthly -- let's explore the pilgrim -- belgr
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)